9 thoughts on “The Content Marketing Fail, aka “the Twinkie Effect”

  1. Billy, I was just thinking about this topic yesterday. In fact I posed the question on Twitter: “Would you follow yourself.” My point was – when should you not post anything rather than throwing up “old Twinkies?”

    I think everything starts from a central business strategy. What are you and your firm about? What makes you different? And what are you really offering people. Once you’ve figured that out, then tailor your content … all your content, even routine suspense phone calls, around this.

    You want to write the posts that your followers read. You want to make the calls they take. You don’t want want to be “the boy who cried wolf” of content marketing … throwing out so many Twinkies that when you actually have a piece of fillet – nobody will believe it.

    There’s no 11th Commandment that says, thou must post daily and Tweet every half hour.

  2. Yes – great point about all of the social links that lead to deserted fan pages. Business owners need to move beyond the billboard and view their website, blog and social media outposts as extensions of their office where the public meets the company.

  3. Mark,

    Thanks. I’m glad you enjoyed it and agree.

    Starting out with content marketing is maybe the easiest part. I thought it made sense to point out a negative result of not sticking with it. It takes a lot to make inbound marketing work and having a “content factory” in place and support from top management are two of the requirements. Persistence and patience are two more.

    (For anyone reading these comments that doesn’t already follow Mark’s blog, I highly recommend it. Almost everything I know about blogging, I either learned or try to copy from him. And I’m still learning… http://www.businessesgrow.com/blog/ )

    Mike,

    That’s a great way of looking at it. Too many companies have sites they rarely visit themselves, much less a magnetic destination for customers and prospects.
    Your suggestion of thinking about it as an extension of “where they work” is interesting. Thanks!

    Doug,

    That story from your past is probably the closest you’ll ever get again to anything resembling the “Twinkie Effect”. You literally wrote the book on Content Marketing. Thanks for commenting!

    (For anyone reading these comments, also read Doug’s B2B Marketing Manifesto and you’ll see what I mean: http://bit.ly/gkx01A )

  4. Clay,

    Just read your comment and totally agree.

    If there is anything as bad as an outdated, dormant or abandoned business blog, it’s the opposite – A constant blast of “junk food” nonsense or promotional hype.

    Maybe Mr. Ed had it right because he didn’t speak unless he had something to say. Of course the horse did or it wouldn’t have been much of show either.

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